Insights on plant compounds: annonaceous acetogenins

Insights on plant compounds: annonaceous acetogenins
Annonaceous acetogenins (ACGs) are a class of plant compounds that are isolated from the Annonaceae (custard-apple family) species, which are most commonly found in the tropical regions of the world. The structure of these compounds are often defined by a series of C32 or C34 fatty acids combined with 2 propanol units terminating with methyl-substituted γ-lactone ring, with tetrahydrofurans (THF) or tetrahydropyrans (THP) rings and functional groups like hydroxyls, epoxides, ketones and/or double bonds, which are present along the hydrocarbon chain. Acetogenins are one of the very rapidly growing classes of compounds offering a broad range of bioactivities like immunosuppressive, pesticidal, antifeedant, antimalarial and antitumour activities. Among all these activities, recent studies have shown that, acetogenins play an important role in inhibitory activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells. They are the most powerful known inhibitors of complex I (NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase) present in the mitochondrial electron transport systems and NADH oxidase found in plasma membranes of cancer cells, which would lead to the depletion of ATP levels and induce apoptosis in the cells. Thus, further studies on the unique chemical and biological variation and effectiveness of these compounds may help in the development of many novel antitumour agents and possibly play an important role in cancer therapy in the near future.
How to cite this article:
Deepa Mary Stanly. Insights on plant compounds: annonaceous acetogenins. BioLim O-Media. 26 September, 2015. 3(7).
Available from: http://archive.biolim.org/omedia/read/BOMA0088.