Computational neuroscience: Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to identify surviving grafts

Computational neuroscience: Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to identify surviving grafts
The stem cells/progenitor cells have been proved to be the best tool for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders for their ability to differentiate into neural lineage cells and contributions in the development of cell-based treatments. The in vivo tracking of these cells via molecular imaging techniques answers the questions of graft survival and rejection. In a very recent research, the bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has been applied to detect the presence of hNPCluc2 in the rat striatum. Bioluminescence imaging is a kind of optical imaging technique that focuses the target cells/tissues, though in even small amount, for light emission. Since the mammalian tissues are non autobio-illuminating and also the background signals are weak due to the lack of external light source, the stem cells need to be induced to express any luciferase protein prior tracking. For the first time, the luciferase expression inviable hNPC (human neural progenitor cells) were induced to visualise the cells for long time in vivo and also the particular location was deduced from BLI. The tracking method revealed fascinating results when the in vivo surviving grafts were detected for over 12 weeks; the surviving ones gave positive result for bioluminescence and the rejected grafts did not produce bioluminescence. The promising advantage of the novel technique is in the field of in vivo cell tracking in therapeutic setting due to high sensitivity and specificity over existing imaging techniques.
How to cite this article:
Sneha C Shaju. Computational neuroscience: Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to identify surviving grafts. BioLim O-Media. 14 October, 2015. 3(8).
Available from: http://archive.biolim.org/omedia/read/BOMA0091.